Age-Based

Age-Based 2017-06-20T12:22:03+00:00

3 Age-Based Options

Investments in the Age-Based Portfolios are based on the age of the beneficiary. Younger beneficiaries will have more money invested in stocks. (Stocks historically have provided additional potential for growth, but they are also more volatile.) As the beneficiary gets older, the assets will automatically shift to portfolios with reduced stock exposure and increased bond and money market investments.

Talk with your investment professional about your college savings objectives to see if an Age-Based Portfolio is right for your situation.

View the following pie charts to see how the Age-Based Aggressive Portfolios change over time as the beneficiary nears college.

Click on “Read More” for information about each portfolio’s objectives, asset allocation, fees, and performance.

Real EstateInternational EquityU.S. EquityFixed IncomeMoney Market

Ages 0–2

Ages 3–5

Ages 6-8

Ages 9-10

Ages 11-12

Ages 13-14

Ages 15-16

Ages 17-18

Ages 19+

View the following pie charts to see how the Age-Based Moderate Portfolios change over time as the beneficiary nears college.

Click on “Read More” for information about each portfolio’s objectives, asset allocation, fees, and performance.

Real EstateInternational EquityU.S. EquityFixed IncomeMoney Market

Ages 0–2

Ages 3–5

Ages 6-8

Ages 9-10

Ages 11-12

Ages 13-14

Ages 15-16

Ages 17-18

Ages 19+

View the following pie charts to see how the Age-Based Conservative Portfolios change over time as the beneficiary nears college.

Click on “Read More” for information about each portfolio’s objectives, asset allocation, fees, and performance.

Real EstateInternational EquityU.S. EquityFixed IncomeMoney Market

Ages 0–2

Ages 3–5

Ages 6-8

Ages 9-10

Ages 11-12

Ages 13-14

Ages 15-16

Ages 17-18

Ages 19+

A Word About Risk: Keep in mind that you can lose money by investing in a portfolio. Each of the Age-Based, Target, and Individual Fund Portfolios involves investment risks, which are described in the Program Disclosure Statement and should be considered before investing. For example, international investing, especially in emerging markets, has additional risks such as currency fluctuation, economic and political risks, and market volatility. Investing in small, medium, and international companies may increase the risk of fluctuations in the value of your investment and involves greater risks than investing in more established companies. Portfolios that invest in specific industries or sectors, such as real estate, have industry concentration risk. As an example, the portfolios that invest in real estate may perform poorly during a downturn in the real estate industry.

Portfolios that invest in bonds are subject to risks such as interest rate risk, credit risk, and inflation risk. In particular, as interest rates rise, the prices of bonds will generally fall, which can impact performance. It is important to note that the value of your account will fluctuate with market conditions. When you withdraw funds, you may have more or less than your actual investment. For more information on the portfolios and the underlying funds in which they invest, see the Program Disclosure Statement.